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Stock# 57216
Description

The First Geological Map of Texas

An unusually fine example of  this important early geological map of Texas by Ferdinand Roemer, published by Adolph Marcus and lithographed by Henry & Cohen, in Bonn.

Roemer's map is the first geological map of Texas. Utilizing T.D. Wilson's map of Texas as a base, Roemer's map of Texas is a work of tremendous historical importance. In some respects, it has never been equaled in accuracy and detail. The geological information, which is conveyed by a color code, is superimposed on a detailed plan of the topography and settlement of the state.

Here the map is presented along with the book it originally appeared in: Roemer's Texas. Mit besonderer Rucksicht auf deutsche Auswanderung und die physichen Verhältnisse des Landes… (Bonn: Adolph Marcus, 1849).

The Dictionary of Scientific Biography notes:

In the spring of 1845 Roemer went to the United States on behalf of the Society for the Protection of German Emigrants. He spent most of his time in Texas, where he remained until April 1847. His vividly written accounts of his travels comprised a pioneering study on the physiography of Texas, together with a report on the society and culture of its inhabitants, remarks on political and economic conditions and a short, clear description of the geology of the region.

 Ferdinand von Roemer (1818-1891) was born in Hanover and came to the United States in 1845. His study of and publication about Texas has been described as "...one of the first scientific investigations of Texas made by someone qualified to do so...J. Frank Dobie states that 'Roemer saw more and told about it in a livelier and more diverting way than any brace of other travelers between Cabeza de Vaca and Frederick Law Olmsted'" (Jenkins, Basic Texas Books). " 

Roemer is considered the father of Texas geology. Roemer traveled Texas for 18 months, exploring the central part of Texas on a trip sponsored by Alexander von Humboldt and the Berlin Academy.

Roemer also illustrates the means of transportation in Texas at the time of Statehood, showing many towns, settlements, forts, ferries, etc.

Roemer had different symbols for oak and pine (or cedar) trees.

Condition Description
First edition. Contemporary tree calf. 8 1/2 x 5 inches (21.5 x 13 cm); xiv, [2], [1]-464pp. Some foxing to the text contents.
Reference
Day, J.M. p.51.