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Stock# 36243ct
Description

Extremely rare separately published double hemisphere map of the World, published in London by Philip Lea.

Philip Lea's map of the world is one of the earliest maps of the world published in England to focus on astronomical observations as decoration for the areas outside the hemispheres. These include a plan of the sun (based on Kircher) surrounded by a planetary system, the face of the moon and images of Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Saturn, based upon Hooke and Cassini. The models of Ptolemy and Tycho Brahe are also shown.

California is shown as an island, with the partial coastlines of New Zealand, New Holland (Australia) and A. Van Diemensland (Tasmania) shown, along with a massive "Compagnie's Land", stretching from Japan to California.

The map is quite rare. We locate only a single example (this copy) of the map offered in a dealer catalog in the past 20 years (Arkway, 2008, Catalog 68, Item 71). The copy cataloged by Arkway is likely the same copy that sold several times between 1988 and 1995. As noted above, this is the same copy as was catalogued by Arkway in 2008.

Condition Description
A few tiny wormholes. Lower centerfold reinforced on verso, with one tear repaired.
Reference
Shirley 535.
Philip Lea Biography

Philip Lea (fl. 1683-1700) was a central figure in the London map community at the end of the eighteenth century. He apprenticed under Robert Morden, with whom he later collaborated. Lea was made free of the Weavers Company in 1689. He was a publisher and a globe and instrument seller with ties to members of government. For example, Samuel Pepys lists him as his map advisor and colorist. He was not known primarily for his own original works, but for his reworking and reissuing of the work of others, particularly the county maps and world map of Christopher Saxton. He also acquired plates from John Seller, John Ogilby, and William Morgan, among others. Later in his career, he collaborated frequently with Herman Moll. After his death in 1700, Philip’s wife, Anne, carried on the business for several decades.