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Philippe Buache:  Planisphere Physique ou l'on voit du Pole Septentrional ce que l'on connoit de Terres et de Mers Avec les Grandges Chaines de Montagnes …[Bay or Sea of the West]

Maps of the Northern Hemisphere


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Title: Planisphere Physique ou l'on voit du Pole Septentrional ce que l'on connoit de Terres et de Mers Avec les Grandges Chaines de Montagnes …[Bay or Sea of the West]

Map Maker: Philippe Buache

Place / Date: Paris / 1756

Coloring: Hand Colored

Size: 17.5 x 13 inches

Condition: VG+

Price: $875.00

Inventory ID: 31515


Description:

Scarce map of the World on a North Polar projection, which is intended to illustrate the watersheds of the World, as the water flows from the various mountain chains to the seas.

Each chain of mountains acts as a watershed to direct the flow of the rivers. Depicts the Sea of the West, incomplete Australia and a host of other interesting features. 

Buache was an academic geographer who researched his material thoroughly, relying on the most up-to-date information from voyages of discovery. He was the first geographer to recognize the important concept of the watershed and it was this concept that led him to make a number of deductions, some correct, some not.  A correct deduction was the existence of Alaska and the Bering Strait, years before they were officially discovered, while an incorrect deduction  was the existence of a central Antarctic sea, which he conjectured to be the source of the icebergs observed by Bouvet in 1738-39.

On the edges of the map is an account of the 1738-9 expedition of Bouvet de Lozier, which mentions the discovery of icebergs between two and three hundred feet high and half a league to two or three leagues in circumference. Buache made Cap de la Circoncision at 54° south, below Africa, a northern promontory of the smaller of his two land masses, next to one of the openings of his polar sea, where Bouvet had recorded his many great icebergs.  Buache also shows the route of the voyage of Abel Tasman (1603-1659) in 1642-3 as a source for information about the southern lands.   

The routes Fernand Quiros in 1605 and Jacques LeMaire in 1616 is also shown, as is Edmund Halley's route in 1700 where Halley also witnessed icebergs.


Related Categories:
Maps of Alaska
Maps of Canada
Maps of the Northern Hemisphere
Polar Maps